Subscribe to this list via RSS Blog posts tagged in Illinois child custody

Hoffman Estates divorce mediation attorneyA study conducted in 2012 showed that many couples choose not to get divorced because they believe it will be too expensive. Even though that study was done several years ago, the same holds true today, and those who are considering ending their marriage may be concerned about the cost of doing so. If you are thinking of getting a divorce in Illinois, you are likely wondering how much will it really cost?

The answer to that question can vary depending on the circumstances of each individual case. However, Illinois is one of the costliest states to get a divorce. In fact, in the Prairie State, the average cost of a divorce is $13,800. When factors such as child support and alimony are involved, the total costs can climb to approximately $35,300. Some factors that can affect these costs include:

The Filing Fee

One cost no couple can get around when filing for divorce is the filing fee. This fee is required in all cases, whether the divorce is contested or uncontested. In Illinois, this fee averages around $289, depending on which county you reside. This is higher than the national average but is still not the highest in the country. In certain situations, such as when a low-income couple is getting a divorce, these fees are sometimes waived.

...

parenting time awards, Illinois fathers, Illinois child custody, Barrington family law attorney, parenting timeStudies repeatedly support the fact that continuous engagement with both parents is key to a child’s long-term development and wellbeing. Divorced parents in Illinois are expected to divide parenting responsibilities (absent issues of danger or neglect), including childcare duties; however, this mandate does not necessarily translate into equal time for both parents. While a growing number of states at least state a strong preference for, if not outright demand, equal parenting time, Illinois has no such provision and merely says both parents are presumed fit and some amount of parenting time should be allocated to each.

A recent study by Custody X Change that looked at how states divided parenting time between mothers and fathers found that Illinois ranked among the bottom, only surpassed by Mississippi, Oklahoma, and Tennessee. Specifically, Illinois fathers, on average, get 23.1 percent of time with their children. Obviously, this number is low, and does not bode well for fathers who must rely on the Court system to make this decision. Consider the following on how Courts evaluate parenting time questions, as well as strategies to boost a father’s chance at receiving more parenting time.

Court’s Assessment of Parenting Time

...

Palatine family law attorney, military child custody proceedingsThe stresses of military deployments can lead struggling couples to begin the process of divorce and custody proceedings while one party is still overseas. However, a federal law, the Servicemember’s Civil Relief Act (SCRA), provides some protection to members of the military who are at a disadvantage in asserting custody rights due to physical distance.

SCRA

Under the Servicemember’s Civil Relief Act, judges are permitted to grant a stay of custody when a military member’s participation in the proceedings is materially affected by his or her service. In fact, stays are mandatory for 90 days after deployment if certain conditions are met, including the submission of:

...

Palatine family law attorney, DCFS reporting requirementsBetween 2011 and 2013, residential Department of Children and Family Services (DCFS) facilities reported 29,425 incidents of children who had gone missing while in DCFS custody. Tragically, many facilities did not immediately report runaways or missing children, making it much more difficult, if not impossible, for local law enforcement to locate them. However, a new law, known as the Safeguard Our Children Act, went into effect in Illinois this year and is aimed at addressing these practices. The law places a series of requirements on DCFS employees in regards to reporting incidences where children of any age, who are under their care, have been missing for more than 12 hours.

Senate Bill 1775

The new law, introduced last year by Senator Bill Cunningham, requires DCFS to consider a child under its care, who is living in a residential facility under contract with the Department, missing if he or she:

...

moving out of Illinois following divorce, Palatine Divorce Lawyer

Order for Removal of Child in Illinois

After your divorce is final, you may find yourself wanting to move out of state. Perhaps you want to be closer to your family, or you have found a new job that will advance your career. Or, you may have remarried and your new spouse needs to relocate for work. The only problem is, you and your ex-spouse have a child custody agreement.

...

Palatine child custody attorney, traveling out of town, children of divorce, Illinois child custody, child custody, out-of-state travel, divorced parents, holiday travel, divorce and the holidaysThe holidays are here, and for many families that means traveling out of state — whether to visit family or to simply get away from the cold Illinois winters and spend time on the beach. But if you are divorced and have a child custody agreement, can you continue to travel out-of-state with your children during the holidays? The answer is yes – but only if the other parent agrees.

Out-of-State Travel with Illinois Children

Illinois law requires each parent who is part of a child custody agreement to retain the other parent’s consent before traveling out of Illinois with the children for vacation. Parental consent is not required for in-state travel.

...

domestic violence child custodyDespite implementation of tougher domestic violence laws in the past two decades, each year thousands of Illinois residents are victimized. In 2013, Illinois domestic violence programs served 44,318 adults and 8,168 children. Illinois child custody laws consider the presence of domestic violence when making an award of custody. Unfortunately, this means that some parents will make false allegations of abuse in an attempt to gain custody.

If you are in the midst of a child custody case that involves domestic violence allegations (whether you are the victim or the victim of false allegations), you need an experienced Palatine child custody attorney who understands the dynamics of domestic violence and the potential implications on your case.

Domestic Violence as Best Interest of the Child Factor

...

Lives change from day to day, month to month, and year to year. Often, what was good or beneficial at one point in life no longer holds the same significance later. Circumstances occasionally arise in which a divorce decree needs to be modified in order to better comport with current living situations.

The Law

An order for child support can be modified upon a showing of substantial change in circumstances. If there is no substantial change in circumstances, then the party receiving the benefits must demonstrate an inconsistency between the amount of the existing order and the amount as determined by the guidelines set forth in 750 ILCS 5, Section 505, unless that inconsistency is the result of a deviation from the guideline amount. This provision, however, only applies if a party is receiving child support enforcement services, and only if at least 36 months have elapsed since the order or last modification. There may also be a modification without showing a substantial change in circumstances, if a need can be shown to provide for the needs of the child’s health care through health insurance or other means.

...
 

Call Today at 847.873.6741 for Your FREE Initial Consultation

We Accept:Credit Cards

Address800 E. Northwest Highway, Suite 321, Palatine, IL 60074

Phone847.873.6741     Fax847.221.3626

Facebook LinkedIn

Resources Privacy Policy Disclaimer Sitemap

© 2019 The Law Office of Nicholas W. Richardson, P.C.
800 E. Northwest Highway, Suite 321, Palatine, IL 60074 | 847.873.6741

OVC Logo